Long fall in Tuckerman Ravine

Events:

On Sunday, March 21, multiple skier falls occurred in Tuckerman Ravine as skiers tested themselves in this  extremely steep terrain. Snow conditions varied that day between boot-top deep soft, wet corn snow with firm crust in the shade or where swept off by skiers and riders. While on patrol, a snow ranger offered some advice to one in a party of three climbers attempting to descend the Lip. The group was properly equipped with ice axes, mountain boots, harnesses and helmets but at least one climber was descending the main ski line wearing micro-spikes. According the the climber, he had switched from crampons due to the “snowballing” that was occurring that day. (Snow can stick between crampon points in sunny, cool conditions). Two others in the party were preparing to use a rope to descend the steep sidehill which represents the now deeply buried Tuckerman Ravine Trail. Later, while descending Sluice, the snow ranger watched as a climber rolled down the 45-50 degree slope, winding up a length of rope in the process. An ice axe fastened to the end of the rope bounced around while coming closer and closer to the falling climber as the rope wound around them. Fortunately, the slope in the Lip is relatively short, or short enough in this case, considering the rope length in this case. No impalement occurred.

Analysis:

The three climbers were receptive to a short demo of the principles and construction of T-axe anchors versus plunged axe or stake anchors just after this near-miss. Training in various snow anchoring and belay methods and the experience and judgement to employ them in the right way in the appropriate terrain can reduce the risk and consequences of falls in our terrain. Consider taking a course in mountaineering skills and be sure sure to carefully match techniques to the terrain and conditions.  An inadequate anchor can lead to significant problems.