General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY FOR THE SEASON. HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS WILL PERSIST UNTIL COMPLETE MELTOUT SO PLEASE READ THIS FINAL ADVISORY BEFORE HEADING INTO THE RAVINES OR TO THE SUMMIT OF MT. WASHINGTON.

This General Advisory will be in effect until complete melt out later this summer. The snow coverage that is left has settled out, been skier compacted, and is going through the late season melt-freeze process. However, the remaining large snowfields may make for a good sliding surface for late season snow. A June snowstorm is not an unheard of occurrence on Mt. Washington. Be prepared for the possibility of new snow instability if this occurs.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area. The trail will reopen after the last snow has melted off, which usually happens near the end of June.

BE AWARE OF FALLING ICE. Each year over 1000 tons of ice form on the steep slopes of Tuckerman Ravine. In the spring it all falls down, often in pieces larger than cars, and often over popular locations like Lunch Rocks and the Tuckerman Ravine trail in the bottom of the ravine. This hazard will persist until complete melt out. The best thing you can do to protect yourself is to avoid spending time in the potential path of falling ice. CREVASSES AND UNDERMINED SNOW appear as the snow pack melts and separates from the ledges on the Headwall. These openings vary tremendously in size and include the many waterfalls on the Headwall. Hiking up what you plan on skiing is recommended so you can see what you’re in for on the way down. Skiers and climbers need to pay attention to what is below at all times and constantly evaluate the potential outcome of a fall or slide.

We sincerely thank all the groups and individuals that helped us make it through the season successfully. We couldn’t do the job without the many volunteer hours carrying injured people down the mountain and giving out good information to visitors. Thanks for a great season and we’ll see you next winter.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Androscoggin Ranger District, the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-27_GENERAL

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

The summit recorded 2″ (5 cm) of snow Saturday night and early Sunday morning and wet snow fell at Hermit Lake on Saturday with a total of 1.5″ of water recorded. Expect another dreary, cold and wet day with slippery trail conditions on Sunday before this low pressure system continues eastward. On Monday, winds will ramp up as the summits clear through the day and though temperatures will warm on Monday, expect a a cold, windy start to the day with temperatures in 20’s and low 30’s F (-5 to 0 C) in the morning. All in all, not a very pleasant holiday weekend in the mountains. Look for a final advisory for the season later this week. Until then, beware of the hazards below when venturing into our forecast area:

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur. Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends at a pile of rocks.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • Issued Sunday, May 26, 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Frank Carus, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-26 General

 

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

This Memorial Day weekend will not have the weather many of us have hoped for. A lingering, slow moving cold front is bringing rain and unseasonably cold temperatures to the mountains. Rain will persist throughout Saturday and into Sunday. At uppermost elevations, temperatures may even go below freezing, creating very slick surfaces. We don’t expect to see the sun until Monday, when the low pressure finally moves out of the way. If you’re heading to Tuckerman, don’t expect to see much traffic. Here are some things you may see, if only you could see through the clouds:

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends at a pile of rocks.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • Issued Saturday, May 25, 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-25_GENERAL

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours.

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Well there is really no way around it, the weather will be less than pleasant over the next 4 days unless you’re a seal.  Rain showers and thunderstorms with lightning is in the mix for the foreseeable future.  Some period of heavy rain with the potential for ground lightning strikes are possible.  This weather will also exacerbate the deteriorating spring hazards discussed below.  Be sure to read the latest summit weather report from the Mount Washington Observatory before heading up the mountain.

  • FALLING ICE. Ice is still falling! Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends on a 35 degree slope.  Pick your routes with this in mind.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • Issued Wednesday, May 22, 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-22 Print Version

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours.

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Pleasant weather on the mountain Sunday will give way to high winds, rain, summit fog and maybe some lightning overnight and into Monday.  Don’t rule out the possibility of some showers Sunday afternoon either.  Temperatures will remain in the 40 degree range (5-10 C) for the next several days and feel higher when the sun is out but cause a shiver when the clouds roll in, so be prepared for these changes. Monitor the Observatory’s forecast for changes before heading out.  The hazards listed below still threaten to spoil your day, if not more, so remain “heads up” when traveling in our terrain. Thanks to the many folks who helped with the rescue on the summit snowfields yesterday!

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends on a 35 degree slope.  Pick your routes with this in mind.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • Issued Sunday, May 19, 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Frank Carus, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-19 Print

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours.

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Drawing closer to the end of May, the snow in Tuckerman is showing signs of persistence, though the overall quality is a long way from where it was earlier in the spring. Skiing in the center or right side of the ravine will be short runs on dirt covered snow. Left Gully is still giving skiers relatively long runs. The weekend weather doesn’t look too bad, especially for early risers. Rain on Saturday afternoon is a possibility, and late day clouds are possible both Saturday and Sunday. Be sure to pack appropriately–this is Mt. Washington in the month of May after all. Daily high temperatures are only forecast to be in the lower 40’s F (4-6C) which is only slightly warmer than my refrigerator at home.  Be sure to check the higher summits forecast before heading up.

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends on a 35 degree slope.  Pick your routes with this in mind.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • Issued Saturday, May 18, 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-18_GENERAL

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours.

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Wednesday will start with fairly clear skies, but an approaching cold front will bring moisture to the mountains late in the day.  As is usual this time of the year, fog will come in along with rain overnight into Thursday.  A chance of showers will persist on Thursday before improving for Friday with a mixture of sun and clouds expected. With cold temperatures likely over the next few mornings anticipate hard snow surfaces. As an example, Wednesday morning’s mercury is only 20F on the summit with the Ravine temperatures just below freezing.  Be sure to look at the Mount Washington Observatory summit forecast at Pinkham Notch before heading up the mountain.

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.
  • SHORT RUNOUTS.  As snow begins melting uphill pay close attention to your runouts and what you may run into if you fall.  Even a fall down low can be unfortunate when the snowline ends on a 35 degree slope.  Pick your routes with this in mind.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters. Issued Wednesday May 15 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-15 Print Version

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours.

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments.  A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Rain showers and periods of fog will continue for Sunday as one weather system exits and another cold front arrives.  In between these we may see a brief period of clearing skies, albeit short lived.  As rain returns into Sunday afternoon and early evening, expect to see dropping temperatures which should turn rain to snow overnight into Monday.  Snow showers are anticipated for Monday before a high pressure system slides in bringing some nicer weather for Tuesday and Wednesday.  With cold temperatures on the way expect  hard snow surfaces, particularly in the morning.  Be sure to look at the Mount Washington Observatory summit forecast at Pinkham Notch before heading up the mountain.

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

Attention aux randonneurs!  Une section du sentier du Tuckerman Ravine est présentement fermé à toutes les activités.  Cette section est située entre Lunch Rocks et le sommet du Headwall jusqu’où ce dernier rejoint le sentier du Alpine Garden. Cette fermeture inclut également toute activité de descente dans le secteur du Lip. Seulement cette section du sentier est fermé. Cette fermeture annuelle est due à l’ampleur des crevasses et à la gravité qu’occasionnerait une chute dans ce secteur.

The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed for the season. Plan to hike down from Hermit Lake.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters. Issued Sunday May 12 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-12 Print Version

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments. A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours. A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

Wet weather will continue to threaten the mountains for the weekend as a cold front sweeps through the region.  Today rain, perhaps heavy at times, is forecasted to last the majority of the day along with winds gusting over 55mph (88kph) and fog.   Precipitation is expected to continue into Sunday albeit lighter than today with a decreasing wind.  If I had to choose one weekend day to come up I’d pick tomorrow although it will likely still be wet.  I would because of less rain and the likelihood for less fog.  This would make things generally more pleasant for being comfortable as well as reduce risk.  Heavier rain today will increase the icefall hazard and fog will limit my ability to see ice coming and respond.  The combination of icefall and fog makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up.  The following is a brief list of the main spring hazards we are concerned with right now.

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, and under the Lip-Center Bowl area. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur.   Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.

A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail.  This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed for the season. Plan to hike down from Hermit Lake.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters. Issued Saturday May 11 2013.  A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-11 Print Version

 

General Advisory for Tuckerman Ravine

A General Advisory is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments. A new advisory will be issued when conditions warrant or within 72 hours. A general advisory for Tuckerman will be in effect until complete melt out later this spring/summer. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine.

The long stretch of nice weather came to an abrupt end Wednesday night when over half an inch of rain fell during the evening. Precipitation is expected to continue through the weekend so anyone coming up will face elevated springtime hazards in addition to the possibility of thunderstorms on Thursday. The frequency and severity of the hazards listed below are all made worse by rain and storm runoff:

  • FALLING ICE. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, Lip, and Center Bowl. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur. There is still a lot of ice hanging on the cliffs in the Sluice and headwall. Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the headwall or at Lunch Rocks.
  • CREVASSES AND WATERFALL HOLES. These are growing larger in many locations, the most dangerous locations are in the Lip and Center Bowl. Give them plenty of room, since they are often much larger beneath the surface than what you can see from above and can be much deeper than you might expect. Breaking through weak snow into one of these could be fatal for you or someone in your group. Give these areas plenty of room when hiking up or skiing down.
  • UNDERMINED SNOW. As the snowpack continues to get thinner, this problem gets worse. It is most prominent in places where there is flowing water beneath the snowpack, which includes most of the gullies. While the snow may appear thick and strong on top beware that the snow may be bridging this hazard. When in doubt probe aggressively with a ski pole or ice axe. If you see small holes in the snow or near large rocks, realize there may be large open spaces under the surface.

The Lip area has all of the hazards listed above, as well as the main waterfall holes. Travel in this area is not recommended. This terrain is a “no fall zone,” where the consequences of a slip at any point can be dire. We will be closing the Lip to skiing and any other use as well as the section of the Tuckerman Ravine hiking trail between Lunch Rocks and the Alpine Garden on Friday. This is an annual closure due to the unique and significant hazards posed to hikers and skiers.

The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed for the season. Plan to hike down from Hermit Lake.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers or the AMC at Pinkham Notch Visitor Center or Hermit Lake Shelters.

Frank Carus, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

2013-05-09 Printable version