Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:00a.m., Sunday May 29th 2011

THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY FOR THE SEASON. HOWEVER, CERTAIN HAZARDS WILL PERSIST UNTIL MELTOUT SO PLEASE READ THIS FINAL ADVISORY BEFORE HEADING INTO THE RAVINES OR TO THE SUMMIT OF MT. WASHINGTON.

This GENERAL ADVISORY will be in effect until complete melt out later this summer. The snow coverage that is left has settled out, been skier compacted, and is going thru the late season melt-freeze process. However, the numerous large snowfields may make for a good sliding surface for late season snow. A June or early July snowstorm is not an unheard of occurrence on Mt. Washington. Be prepared for the possibility of new snow instability if this occurs. Also watch for the possibility of sustained warm weather and/or heavy rain to blow out running water from beneath the snow. This has caused wet slush avalanches in Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines in the past.

THE LIP AND THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL THROUGH THE RAVINE FROM LUNCH ROCKS, ON THE FLOOR OF THE BOWL, TO THE JUNCTION WITH THE ALPINE GARDEN TRAIL JUST ABOVE THE HEADWALL ARE CLOSED TO ALL USE. Only this section of the trail is closed. This section is closed annually due to the magnitude of crevasses and undermining that develop in this area during the spring meltout. A fall in this area could have severe consequences. This trail section will be reopened when the tread melts out. Until then, be prepared to use an alternate route. Check in with one of the local visitor centers to determine the status of the closure before starting up. If you use motorized access to the summit of Mt. Washington it is NOT recommended that you descend any route through the Ravines. You will not be aware of the hazards below you. Many have attempted this over the years, often resulting in severe accidents.

BE AWARE OF FALLING ICE. Each year over 1000 tons of ice form on the Headwall and in other areas in Tuckerman Ravine as well as the gullies of Huntington Ravine. In the spring it all comes down, often in pieces larger than cars. This hazard will persist until complete melt out.   CREVASSES AND UNDERMINED SNOW EXIST. These openings vary tremendously in size and include the many waterfalls on the Headwall. Hiking up what you plan on skiing is recommended so you can see what you’re in for on the way down.   Skiers and climbers need to pay attention to what is below at all times and constantly evaluate the potential outcome of a fall or slide. As the water runs and melts out the snow from beneath, undermining will continue to occur, collapsing the snow above.

Brian and Justin will walk out of the Ravines for the last time as Snow Rangers today. They move on to new Forest Service positions here on the White Mountain so they won’t be too far away.  We are happy for their promotions, but are sad to see them leave us after about a decade of outstanding service on the mountain.  Their skills and personality will be hard to replace.  What exactly will happen next season is still unclear, but certainly you will see Jeff and I as the snow flies again. Thanks for a great season and we’ll see you next winter.

Please Remember:Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel. A new advisory will be issued when needed at the beginning of 2011-2012 season.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted at 7:10a.m., Saturday, May 28, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

Happy Memorial Day Weekend! If you haven’t noticed yet, summer has been standing on the doorstep for some time now just waiting to be officially welcomed in. Mt Washington has received a meager three inches of snow in the last 30 days and only about 15″ since April 7. Following the trend of the past winter season, this is well below average. On the whole, the weather for the coming weekend doesn’t look all that bad, but there will be chances for rain showers, including thunderstorms and lightning, as well as clouds and fog in upper elevations. Keep checking the weather forecasts when possible throughout the weekend, and pack and plan accordingly. Getting caught unprepared in a thunderstorm in alpine terrain can be a hair-raising experience you’d rather not have.

The traditional spring hazards in the ravines continue to be an issue. Realize clouds and fog may make identifying them very difficult.  The RUNOUTS of even the best descent routes have melted back revealing boulders, trees and cliffs.  Think about where you’ll end up if you slide or ski out of control.  CREVASSES have formed in many areas and we recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of them unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be difficult or impossible, especially if you’ve got a board or skis on your feet.

UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over stream beds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin.  FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. We’ve had a lot of ice fall over the past few weeks and have made it through the worst of it unscathed. However some ice still exists so your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted at 8:30a.m., Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

 This morning was a sort of lifting of the curtain you might say.  Foul weather with constant clouds has obscured visibility for long stretches over the past week and I was anxious to see what the day’s clear skies might reveal.  As expected the clouds and warm temperatures have eaten away at much of the 2010/2011 snowpack.  Hillman’s has fallen apart at the bottom requiring a bushwhack to get into it and the upper section is no longer continuous with breaks just above the fork.  Left Gully is a little more continuous but the bottom has melted back from the main bowl and now necessitates a short thrash to enter.  At this point one of the longer and safer runs is the leftovers of the Sluice.  The large ice cliffs above it have melted and fallen apart eliminating one of the most notorious hazards in the Ravine. These conditions will likely change over the course of the week as today’s warm and sunny conditions will soon be replaced by more rain and clouds.  Temperatures are expected to remain warm and melting will continue around the clock.

Our traditional spring hazards continue to be an issue. Realize clouds and fog may make identifying them very difficult.  The RUNOUTS of even the best descent routes have melted back revealing boulders, trees and cliffs.  Think about where you’ll end up if you slide or ski out of control.  CREVASSES have formed in many areas and we recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of them unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible. Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid.

UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over stream beds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin.  FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. We’ve had a lot of ice fall over the past few weeks and have made it through the worst of it unscathed. However some ice still exists so your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use.  

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters .
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Justin Preisendorfer, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted at 7:30a.m., Sunday May 22st, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

When I woke up on Sunday morning I saw something I hadn’t in a long time; the sun!  This relief from low pressure may be short lived so enjoy it if you can.  The end of the weekend will bring partly cloudy skies with summit temperatures in the 50s F (10s C).  Fog will return to the mountains on Sunday night and Monday’s weather will be dominated by clouds and a chance of rain.  Showers and thunderstorms are likely for Tuesday with the hopes of better weather in the long range forecast.

Ski runs have changed a lot over the past week.  Hillman’s has fallen apart at the bottom and now requires a bush whack to get into it.  The snow in Left Gully has detached from the main bowl near the bottom which also necessitates a short thrash to enter.  The Chute has narrowed substantially in the constriction of the hourglass and has a poor runout at the bottom.  The lower Sluice has ticked it’s way up the ladder of the best to ski due to the ice above falling which reduces the objective hazards.  The lower half from the cliffs down is a reasonable choice, but consider your rock runout below before skiing or riding.

Our traditional spring hazards continue to be an issue.  Realize clouds and fog may make identifying them very difficult.

  1. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found throughout the Ravine. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible.  Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid.
  2. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over stream beds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin.
  3. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years.  We’ve had a lot of ice fall over the past 2 weeks and have made it through the worst of it.  However some ice still exists primarily in the Center Headwall. Ice fall doesn’t always go straight down the fall line so it’s not uncommon for Headwall ice to arc into the lower half of Lunch Rocks (or “Icefall Rocks”). Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. This trail has a section that traverses a steep snow slope. We recommend having an ice axe and crampons for safe travel through this section; this is especially important if the trail is frozen and icy.  The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use. Please do not ski on the hiking trail.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Brian Johnston, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted at 8:30a.m., Saturday May 21st, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

Talk about Deja Vu!  Yet another rainy Saturday is upon us, but the developing weather picture is making today look like it could be the worst one of the month so far.  A backdoor cold front and instability will trigger thunder and lightning potential later this morning into the afternoon.  In their weather outlook the Observatory focused on the possibility of lightning strikes in the alpine zone today which adds to the typical hazards to be concerned about.  Once above treeline you will lose control of mitigating this hazard.  The higher you are in elevation generally the higher the probability of you and lightning meeting. Due to this I would be quite weary of being above treeline today. As is typical with thunderstorms some heavy bursts of rain can also be expected.  No matter where you are anticipate a fair amount of precipitation today so have the appropriate clothing with you.  The front should move out tonight and bring improving conditions on Sunday with some sun breaking through the clouds. 

Ski runs have changed a lot this week.  Hillman’s has fallen apart quite a bit at the bottom and is now requires a bush whack to get into it.  The snow in Left Gully has detached from the main bowl near the bottom which also necessitates a short thrash to enter.  The Chute has narrowed substantially in the constriction of the hourglass and has a poor runout at the bottom.  The lower Sluice has ticked it’s way up the ladder of the best to ski due to the ice above falling which reduces the objective hazards.  The lower half from the cliffs down is a reasonable choice, but consider your rock runout below before skiing or riding.

In addition to the weather our traditional spring hazards continue to be an issue.  Realize clouds and fog may make identifying them very difficult particularly those that move such as falling ice or people.

  1. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible.  Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid.
  2. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin.
  3. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years.  We’ve had a lot of ice fall over the past 2 weeks and have made it through the worst of it.  However some ice still exists primarily in the Center Headwall. Ice fall doesn’t always go straight down the fall line so it’s not uncommon for Headwall ice to arc into the lower half of Lunch Rocks (or “Icefall Rocks”). Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. This trail has a section that traverses a steep snow slope. We recommend having an ice axe and crampons for safe travel through this section; this is especially important if the trail is frozen and icy.  The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use. Please do not ski on the hiking trail.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:23a.m., Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

Rain continues to dominate the forecast for the rest of the workweek.  Lucky for us, the biggest rains are behind us at this point because we’ve gotten soaked with more than 2.5” (6cm) since low pressure rolled in last weekend.  The high end of forecasted rain amounts would push over 1” (2.5cm) by the time the sun starts to regain control this weekend.  We’ll likely see about half as much but the problems it creates will be the same.  Thick fog may severely limit your visibility. Not only can this be surprisingly disorienting, but it can prevent you from being able to get a handle on the springtime hazards that are now widespread in the ravines. Practice good situational awareness and pay attention to the following hazards that are a regular piece of springtime on Mt Washington:

  1. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in Tuckerman is currently in the Center Bowl, though Sunday a snowboarder in Left Gully had falling ice come closer than he probably cared for. Ice fall doesn’t always go straight down the fall line so it’s not uncommon for Center Headwall ice to arc into the lower half of Lunch Rocks. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above, and to be thinking about what you’ll do when you hear the strange cracking and crashing sounds from the cliffs or hear people yelling “ICE!”.
  2. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible.  Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid. You don’t want to learn this lesson firsthand!
  3. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin. The bottom of Hillman’s Highway and the top of the Sluice are two examples of where this hazard lurks.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use. Please do not ski on the hiking trail!

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. This trail has a section that traverses a steep snow slope. We recommend having an ice axe and crampons for safe travel through this section; this is especially important if the trail is frozen and icy.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Justin Preisendorfer, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:00a.m., Sunday May 15, 2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

Rain will be the dominant weather feature over the next few days. As much as 3″ of liquid is forecasted to fall between now and Tuesday night, most of which will come between Sunday and Monday mornings. In the mountains, thick fog can severely limit your visibility. Not only can this be surprisingly disorienting, but it can prevent you from being able to get a handle on the springtime hazards in the ravines. We’re at a point late in the season, and these hazards have fully matured. Pay attention to what’s around you up in the Bowl, and give these hazards careful consideration before committing yourself to a specific route:

  1. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in Tuckerman is currently in the Center Bowl, though Sunday a snowboarder in Left Gully had falling ice come closer than he probably cared for. Ice fall doesn’t always go straight down the fall line so it’s not uncommon for Center Headwall ice to arc into the lower half of Lunch Rocks. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above, and to be thinking about what you’ll do when you hear the strange cracking and crashing sounds from the cliffs or hear people yelling “ICE!”.
  2. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible.  Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid. You don’t want to learn this lesson firsthand!
  3. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up near rocks, bushes, and other areas where the snowpack is thin. The bottom of Hillman’s Highway and the top of the Sluice are two examples of where this hazard lurks.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The John Sherburne Ski Trail is closed to all use. Please do not ski on the hiking trail!

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open. This trail has a section that traverses a steep snow slope. We recommend having an ice axe and crampons for safe travel through this section; this is especially important if the trail is frozen and icy.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel. Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted Saturday 5/14/2011, 7:50am

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

It’s clear that rain will dominate the forecast for the upcoming week kicking off later today.  Since yesterday’s weather forecasts the possibility of precipitation (PoP) and the expected water amounts (QPF) have increased substantially.  Rain is expected to begin later today and pick up tonight and through tomorrow.  Forecasts are anticipating us to receive an inch (2.54cm) of rain by some point during the day tomorrow and perhaps another inch + (2.54+cm) Sunday night into Monday.  Along with this will be FOG WHICH COULD MAKE ASSESSING THE HAZARDS DISCUSSED BELOW VERY DIFFICULT.  Take this into account before committing to steep terrain or being in the runout of icefall.  While snow stability concerns may currently be put to rest there are several significant hazards you need to be aware of.  Each spring season the ravines transition into summer by shedding ice off the cliffs, opening large crevasses as the snow slowly creeps downhill, and runoff from snowmelt eats away at the undersides of snow bridges.  Over the years numerous people have been injured or worse by these springtime hazards; it would be a great season to have not one single person hurt by falling ice, crevasses, etc. Pay attention to what’s around you up in the Bowl, and give these hazards careful consideration before committing yourself to a specific route:

  1. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in Tuckerman is currently in the Center Bowl.  Most of the ice up behind Lunch Rocks (aka “Ice Fall Rocks”) in the Sluice cliffs has fallen, but some smaller icefall is still possible from this general region. Both the Headwall ice and the Sluice area ice can crash into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT.  Ice fall doesn’t always go straight down the fall line so it’s not uncommon for Center Headwall ice to arc into the lower half of Lunch Rocks. Huntington also has icefall potential in numerous areas. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above, and to be thinking about what you’ll do when you hear the strange cracking and crashing sounds from the cliffs or hear people yelling “ICE!”.
  2. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up and out of a deep crevasse may be impossible.  Imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone with ropes and anchors to come to your aid. You don’t want to learn this lesson firsthand!
  3. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up at the bottom of gullies where the snowpack is thinnest. The bottom of Hillman’s Highway is one example of where this hazard lurks.

 A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The top 25-30% of the Sherburne Ski Trail is still open but requires some walking through several sections. We would all rather walk down from Hermit Lake than subject ourselves to the upper quarter of the Sherburne in its current state. There is no skiing on the Tuckerman Ravine Hiking Trail.

 

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel. Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • A new General Advisory will be issued when conditions warrant.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Valid Thursday 5/12/2011 – Saturday 5/14/2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

While snow stability concerns may be put to rest for the season (barring a sizable late-season storm) There are several significant hazards we want you to be aware of. Each spring season the ravines transition into summer by shedding ice off the cliffs, opening large crevasses as the snow slowly creeps downhill, and runoff from snowmelt eats away at the undersides of snow bridges. Finding one of these hazards can sometimes be humorous, sometimes it can be annoying or uncomfortable, and if luck isn’t on your side, the hazards can turn deadly. Over the years we’ve seen numerous people victimized by the springtime hazards; it would be a great season to have not one single person injured by falling ice, crevasses, etc. Pay attention to what’s around you up in the Bowl, and give these hazards careful consideration before committing yourself to a specific route:

  1. FALLING ICE has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in Tuckerman is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. It gets better once all the ice has fallen from the Sluice, but we regularly see ice from the Center Headwall shoot sideways across the rocks. Huntington also has icefall potential in numerous areas. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above, and to be thinking about what you’ll do when you hear the strange cracking and crashing sounds from the cliffs.
  2. CREVASSES have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size. Getting yourself up out of a deep crevasse is challenging even for experienced mountaineers with climbing equipment, so try to imagine what it’s like to be wedged into a constriction wearing skis or a board, barely able to move, and hoping for someone to come to your aid. You don’t want to learn this lesson firsthand!
  3. UNDERMINED SNOW often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up at the bottom of gullies where the snowpack is thinnest. The bottom of Hillman’s Highway is one example of where this hazard lurks.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

We’ll be evaluating the Sherburne Ski Trail and closing the trail when conditions warrant. For now, I can tell you that I would personally rather walk down from Hermit Lake than subject myself to the top third of the Sherburne in its current state. DO NOT SKI ON THE HIKING TRAIL DOWN FROM HERMIT LAKE.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel. Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (603) 466-2713 end_of_the_skype_highlighting TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Valid Monday 5/9/2011 – Wednesday 5/11/2011

Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines are under a General Advisory. We have finished using the 5-scale danger rating system for the remainder of the season. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain.

Both ravines are now under a “General Advisory” for avalanche conditions; these advisories are in effect for three days or less. We’ll be keeping an eye on the weather, snowpack, and other hazards and updating the advisory if needed. As we would hope you do every day you’re in avalanche terrain, you will need to do your own snow stability assessments. These don’t need to be full depth data pits, but you should be at least thinking about the snowpack even if your assessment takes just a fraction of a second. Looking at the weather for Monday through Wednesday, I don’t see anything at this time that would affect the current snow stability.

Unless a significant weather event takes place, it is the other hazards that should be at the forefront of your mind when traveling into the ravines in late spring. The list of ways one can get seriously injured up here is long. Here are the top few that are unique to springtime conditions you will find in the ravines:

  1. Falling ice has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in Tuckerman is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. Huntington also has icefall potential in numerous areas. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.
  2. Crevasses have formed in many areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up at the bottom of gullies where the snowpack is thinnest.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The top third of the Sherburne Ski Trail is currently open.  This section is riddled with moguls, bare sections, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, take off your skis and walk down the hiking trail. Do not ski on the hiking trail, please.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel. Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:00a.m., Sunday, May 08, 2011

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human-triggered avalanches are unlikely. Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington Ravine. A danger of falling ice exists and will persist until it all comes down.

Sometimes you’ve just got to go with the best information available. That’s what we all did yesterday when looking at the weather forecasts. The actual weather turned out much better than expected: a few spits of rain from the sky and numerous breaks of sunshine throughout the day. So although we prepared for mostly cloudy and rainy weather, it actually turned into a nice day overall. It’s never a bad idea to hope for the best while being prepared for the worst. Today the weather is starting out quite nice again, but the forecasts are calling for increasing clouds in the afternoon and a slight chance of a late day shower. Getting an early start will help you stay out of the clouds, but be prepared for decreasing visibility if you’re out on the mountain late.

The snowpack has been going through its annual springtime deterioration and the regular hazards have become more widespread.  This week’s ravine is much less attractive than last week’s and the following hazards deserve special attention:

  1. Falling Ice is a serious hazard and has injured and killed many people through the years. The largest ice in the ravine is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. Your best defense is to not spend time in areas where ice looms above.
  2. Crevasses have formed in numerous areas, the largest of these can be found in the Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace. Crevasse edges are often less stable than they appear, so steer clear of these unless you can safely evaluate their size.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up at the bottom of gullies where the snowpack is thinnest.

A section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is now closed to all use. This section extends from Lunch Rocks to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail, and includes skiing or riding through the Lip area. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area.

The top third of the Sherburne Ski Trail is currently open.  This section is riddled with moguls, bare sections, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, please walk down the hiking trail. The hike down from Hermit Lake to where the ski trail is closed is roughly 15 minutes, so you might want to consider walking all the way.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:00a.m., Saturday, May 07, 2011

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human-triggered avalanches are unlikely. Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington Ravine. A danger of falling ice exists and will persist until it all comes down.

A number of folks showed genuine excitement yesterday because they heard we got snow.  Rooster tails of champagne powder filled their dreams but the reality was much different.  A dusting of snow was about what we received in the ravines and all it really did was temporarily obscure some of the smaller crevasses.  To fill in the larger crevasses you’d need a fleet of dump trucks and access to a pile of snow like you’d see in a Walmart parking lot during the late winter.  In the absence of the big May dump we’re working with pretty typical late spring conditions.  Rain on Wednesday drenched the snowpack and immediately following, temperatures dropped below freezing where they’ve hung for much of the last three days.  An ice ax and the ability to self arrest will be key to safe travel when snow conditions are icy.  It is now above freezing at Hermit Lake so I think soft snow will soon be a reality.

The snowpack has been going through its annual springtime deterioration and the regular hazards have become more widespread.  This week’s ravine is much less attractive than last week’s and the following hazards deserve special attention:

  1. Traveling through the Lip area is NOT RECOMMENDED due to the open waterfall and very large crevasses. A slip in this area would be disastrous so show everyone how smart you are and find someplace else to make turns.
  2. Crevasses have formed in numerous areas. The Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl have the largest and deepest of these. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water and keep a heads up at the bottom of gullies where the snowpack is thinnest.
  4. Falling Ice is a serious hazard. You can’t know for sure when it will fall, so do your best not to spend time in locations where ice looms above. The largest ice in the ravine is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. There are better locations to park yourself farther down in the ravine.

The top third of the Sherburne Ski Trail is currently open.  This section is riddled with moguls, bare spots, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, please walk down the hiking trail.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Justin Preisendorfer, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

 

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:15a.m., Friday, May 06, 2011

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human-triggered avalanches are unlikely. Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington Ravine. A danger of falling ice exists and will persist until it all comes down.

A light dusting of snow is all we got yesterday. The summit recorded 1.8″ (4.5cm) of new snow, which is barely enough to obscure some of the old surface around the ravine. Temperatures will rebound today, rising above the freezing mark during the day and staying there through tomorrow. Meanwhile, winds will decrease to 35-50mph (55-80kph). Looking at the forecasts, I would expect today to be a reasonable day to spend in the mountains, but Saturday rain showers are likely which will make staying comfortable a lot more challenging. If you are out today, expect surfaces to be very icy to start the day. A fall on the icy slopes can be a bad way to end your day. Be patient and you should be rewarded with softer surfaces to slide on.

The snowpack has been going through its annual springtime deterioration and the regular hazards have become more widespread.  This week the decay continued, albeit at a much less rapid pace than we’ve seen recently. With the return of warm sun today and rain tomorrow you’ll need to pay attention to the following springtime hazards:

  1. Traveling through the Lip area is NOT RECOMMENDED due to the open waterfall and very large crevasses. Each season the Tuckerman Ravine Trail through this area is closed due to the unique nature of these objective hazards. We expect this closure will take effect near the start of this weekend.
  2. Crevasses have formed in numerous areas. The Lip, Sluice, and Center Bowl have the largest and deepest of these. Other areas also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water.
  4. Falling Ice is a serious hazard. You can’t know for sure when it will fall, so do your best not to spend time in locations where ice looms above. The largest ice in the ravine is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. There are better locations to park yourself farther down in the ravine.

The Sherburne Ski Trail is currently open a little farther than halfway down. The open section is riddled with moguls, bare spots, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, please walk down the hiking trail.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 7:40a.m., Thursday, May 05, 2011

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human-triggered avalanches are unlikely. Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington Ravine. A danger of falling ice exists and will persist until it all comes down.

Just because it’s snowing on the mountain this morning doesn’t mean you should drop everything and jump in the car. Nope, today actually has a nasty raw feeling to it, kind of like a cold November day. If you’re heading up this way, be sure to check the weather forecast for the higher summits and pack and plan accordingly. Temperatures are falling into the 20sF (-6C), meanwhile winds will be picking up through the day reaching around 40mph (64kph) by dusk. Throw some wet snow into the thick fog and you can imagine what the conditions will be like. Snow accumulations today might be limited to around an inch (2.5cm), or they might get as deep as 4” (10cm). This won’t be enough to break the streak of Low danger ratings today, but it might be just enough for the unwelcome “dust on crust” scenario to unfold. With temperatures as low as they are, expect the snow surfaces to be very icy and slick. Long sliding or tumbling falls are a real threat today. Poor visibility will limit your ability to see all the hazards, such as the large crevasse or rocks that might be in your fall line.

The snowpack has been going through its annual springtime deterioration and the regular hazards have become more widespread.  When clouds, fog, and snow limit your visibility it becomes more important to choose your routes carefully:

  1. Traveling through the Lip area is NOT RECOMMENDED due to the open waterfall and very large crevasses. Each season the Tuckerman Ravine Trail through this area is closed due to the unique nature of these objective hazards. We expect this closure will take effect near the start of this weekend.
  2. Crevasses have formed in numerous areas. The Lip and Center Bowl have the largest and deepest of these. The Sluice and Chute also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water.
  4. Falling Ice is a serious hazard each season, but will be put on the back burner until temperatures heat up again later in the weekend.

The Sherburne Ski Trail is currently open a little farther than halfway down. The open section is riddled with moguls, bare spots, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, please walk down the hiking trail.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory

 

 

Avalanche Advisory for Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines

Posted 8:00am Wednesday May 4, 2011

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human-triggered avalanches are unlikely. Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington Ravine. A danger of falling ice exists and will persist until it all comes down.

There are days when I’d rather not look at the weather forecasts, especially those with icons that represent each day’s expected weather for the coming week.  Today is one of those stick-your-head-in-the-sand type days.  I won’t dwell on the unsettled weather forecasted for the next 5-7 days but let’s talk about today.  There is currently a Flood Watch in effect for northern NH and we’re expected to see up to 1″ (2.5cm) of rain.  A passing cold front will be largely responsible for triggering the rain and as it marches through temperatures will fall.  Tonight they are expected to dip below freezing on the summit for the first time since Sunday morning.  You might be hoping that the drop in temps will change the rain over to snow and you’re sort of in luck.  We are expecting a transition to snow but unfortunately I think it’s going to be accompanied by sleet and freezing rain.  I’ll keep my fingers crossed for pure snow but it’s good to stay grounded in reality.  In my opinion today will be a pretty miserable day to be in the mountains.  Rain and falling temps is a recipe for hypothermia.  If you do decide to visit wear your rain gear and be conservative in your decision-making.  The snowpack is going through its annual springtime deterioration and the regular hazards are becoming more widespread.  When clouds and fog limit your visibility it becomes more difficult to pick out the following:

  1. Falling Ice is a serious hazard. You can’t know for sure when it will fall, so do your best not to spend time in locations where ice looms above. The largest ice in the ravine is in the Center Bowl and up on the cliffs above Lunch Rocks. Both of these areas send ice into Lunch Rocks. For this reason, WE DO NOT RECOMMEND LUNCH ROCKS AS A SAFE PLACE TO SIT. There are better locations to park yourself farther down in the ravine.
  2. Crevasses have formed in numerous areas. The Lip and Center Bowl have the largest and deepest of these. The Sluice and Chute also have smaller crevasses growing. We recommend you hike up the route you plan to descend so you can assess these hazards at a leisurely pace.
  3. Undermined Snow often hides running water below and it can quickly ruin your day if you break through. Snow bridges will be further weakened by the increased water levels today, so avoid traveling over streambeds and areas of running water.
  4. Traveling through the Lip area is NOT RECOMMENDED due to the open waterfall and very large crevasses. Each season the Tuckerman Ravine Trail through this area is closed due to the unique nature of these objective hazards. This week we’ll continue to have more warm weather and rain, so we may reach the point where this closure will take effect before next weekend.

 The Sherburne Ski Trail is open a little farther than halfway down. The open section is better than hiking but is riddled with moguls, bare spots, rocks and ice.  After the closure rope, please walk down the hiking trail.   

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast. For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters.
  • This advisory expires at midnight. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Justin Preisendorfer, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713  TTY (603) 466-2856

Printable Advisory