Avalanche Forecast Archives

2015 – 2016 Season

General Bulletin for Saturday, May 28, 2016

Date: May 28, 2016
A General Bulletin is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. We will post the last Bulletin/Advisory of the season tomorrow. Early summer heat has hit snow coverage hard this week with notable daily changes.  Skiing/riding opportunities have fallen apart quickly and have begun to move into the novelty variety to say you did it.  Expect poor […]

General Bulletin for Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Date: May 25, 2016
....Falling ice is the greatest objective hazard whether you are down on the floor, at the base of Icefall Rocks (Lunch Rocks), or up on the slope. We expect this threat to continue through the holiday weekend. Recently, very large icefall occurred from the Center Bowl, which had two people literally running for their lives. Stay alert as we are still in icefall season. We are wrapping up our season over the next 5 days so you can expect the last Bulletin to be issued this weekend....

General Bulletin for Sunday, May 22, 2016

Date: May 22, 2016
...Very large icefall occurred in this area on Saturday, which had two people literally running for their lives. Stay alert as we are still in icefall season. The Center Bowl and under the Lip looks pretty ugly and their icefall and open hole hazards are generally obvious. It may not be as obvious if in the fog with rain so planning to stay clear of these areas is a smart idea....

General Bulletin for Saturday, May 21, 2016

Date: May 21, 2016
...If you are thinking of hiking above treeline, realize there are no options to hike through Tuckerman, only into it, and then backtracking down again. Obviously, if you get above treeline through a variety of other options there is also no way down through Tuckerman....

General Bulletin for Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Date: May 18, 2016
....realize there are no options to hike through Tuckerman, only into it and then backtracking down again. Obviously, if you get above treeline through a variety of other options there is also no way down through Tuckerman. Although it was a poor winter the cold spring has allowed snow and ice to linger in the Ravine later than initially expected....

General Bulletin for Sunday, May 15, 2016

Date: May 15, 2016
Below freezing temperatures overnight tonight will drop further on Monday, eventually reaching the mid-teens on Monday night. As a result, trails above tree-line will become icy again so don’t forget your micro-spikes. Snowfields and slopes will refreeze at some point today and likely remain rock solid Monday and Tuesday making crampons and an ice axe essential tools as the refreeze occurs.

General Bulletin for Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Date: May 14, 2016
....We continue to recommend the left (south) side, such as Left gully, over traveling in the center or right side of the Ravine. Left Gully is hanging in there and has the best snow coverage and longest run in Tuckerman.... Areas immediately adjacent to and under the closed “Lip” area on the right side have all of the hazards listed below; travel in this area is not recommended. Ice issues continue to be a problem in all the traditional locations, albeit less than a week ago as it continues to be shed off of the rock cliffs. So it's still the Icefall mean season!

General Bulletin for Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Date: May 11, 2016
.....Icefall and weakening of snow bridges over holes are the main issues we are concerned about right now. Icefall over the next 72 hours is almost a guarantee, but the exact timing is impossible to predict so stay away from the main runouts in the Center Bowl and the right (north) side. A chance of showers will begin on Friday afternoon and then unfortunately will be in the forecast through the weekend. Between icefall and melting snow over the next five days, anticipate a rapid change in over conditions as the Ravine starts to put it's summer face on....

General Bulletin for Sunday, May 8, 2016

Date: May 8, 2016
A General Bulletin is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. A new General Bulletin will be issued within 72 hours or when conditions warrant. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine. Rain that began overnight on Saturday will continue through Sunday, changing to sleet and snow as temperatures begin to drop around midday. By […]

General Bulletin for Saturday, May 7, 2016

Date: May 7, 2016
....This will make alpine travel a hypothermia event for those unprepared with the best gear. Rain soaking your gear, changing to snow with heat sucking wind, is never ideal for a pleasurable mountain experience. Generally, not a great weekend weather wise, but you won't have a lot of competition for your favorite rock to sit on, or gully to ski/ride. So if you have the right gear with an adventurous, yet cautious spirit, maybe we'll see you over the next couple of days....

General Bulletin for Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Date: May 4, 2016
....Mixed precipitation on Wednesday and Thursday, changing to rain at all elevations, will continue to dominate the mountains. At the ravine level you can expect mostly rain and fog. Looking at the extended forecast, we expect a brief moisture reprieve on Friday, but then rain returning for the weekend. Rain will exacerbate the typical spring hazards listed below more rapidly than we have have seen recently. Anticipate falling ice to be the most significant threat in the near term due to this moisture and fog....

General Bulletin for Sunday, May 1, 2016

Date: May 1, 2016
...but wind slabs may develop as winds ramp up and shift west and precipitation grows in intensity and the freeze line drops in elevation as forecasted for Monday. New snow may also cover and hide crevasses. Be sure to evaluate the avalanche hazard Monday and Tuesday, especially if snow fall totals in our start zones reach those forecast by the Observatory for the summit. Hollow sounding slabs or large smooth pillows in steep terrain should be given some time to settle after spring temps return.

General Bulletin for Saturday, April 30, 2016

Date: April 30, 2016
.....If you are visiting this weekend, we recommend the left, or south, side over traveling in the center or right side of the Ravine. Left Gully is the longest run and is still connected to the Bowl proper. Areas immediately adjacent to and under the closed Lip area have all of the hazards in the list below so travel in this area is not recommended and should be avoided. This terrain is “no fall terrain.” The consequences of a slip or fall here could lead to the worst possible outcome.....

General Bulletin for Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Date: April 27, 2016
....But, some isolated instabilities may develop as winds pick up over the next 48hours so assure you have the skill and avalanche experience to make good stability assessments before deciding to enter, or be under, areas of new snow. Cold air between 5-15F and stiff winds on the summit over the next couple of days will allow any isolated wind slab issues to linger......

General Bulletin for Sunday, April 24, 2016

Date: April 24, 2016
A General Bulletin is in effect for Tuckerman Ravine. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments. A new General Bulletin will be issued within 72 hours or when conditions warrant. We are no longer monitoring conditions in Huntington Ravine. High pressure will linger over the mountains on Sunday, creating blue skies and […]

General Bulletin for Saturday, April 23, 2016

Date: April 23, 2016
.....FALLING ICE IS CURRENTLY THE #1 OBJECTIVE HAZARD IN TUCKERMAN. Over the years many people have been severely injured or killed by falling ice in Tuckerman. The most hazardous locations are in the center and right side of the ravine, including Lunch Rocks, the Sluice, Lip, and Center Bowl. Warm weather and rain increase the potential for icefall to occur. There is still a tremendous amount of ice waiting to fall. Avoid spending time in high risk areas such as under the Headwall or at Lunch Rocks, more aptly known as "Icefall Rocks".....

General Bulletin for Friday, April 22, 2016

Date: April 22, 2016
.....***THE BOTTOM LINE: Because of all the issues listed above, the southern side of the Ravine, or lookers left, has dramatically lower objective hazards and risk than the north or right side. Therefore, we recommend the left side over traveling in the center and right side of the Ravine. Left Gully is the longest run and is still connected to the Bowl proper while the Chute offers steeper and more challenging terrain. Although they hold a level of overall general hazard they offer options with lower risk than many other Ravine alternatives...

General Bulletin for Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Date: April 19, 2016
....An increasing NW wind late on Tuesday and into Wednesday will move some snow into lee areas of Tuckerman. The irregular nooks and crannies of the previously bare alpine terrain will absorb an amount of snow being transported, as will the highly variable terrain of the Ravine. Small bump features from skiing over the weekend, melting, rocks, and breaks in the terrain's continuity with brush and cliffs will all help reduce the overall impact of new slab. But, some isolated instabilities may develop so assure you have the skill and avalanche experience to make good stability assessments before deciding to enter any areas of new snow....

General Bulletin for Monday, April 18, 2016

Date: April 18, 2016
....AS OF TODAY (Monday 4/18) A SECTION OF THE TUCKERMAN RAVINE TRAIL WILL BE CLOSED TO ALL USE. This section extends from Lunch Rocks at the floor of the Ravine to the top of the Headwall where it meets the Alpine Garden Trail. Only this section of the trail is closed. This annual closure is due to the magnitude of the crevasses and undermining, and the severe consequences of a fall in this area. This includes no skiing or riding through the Lip area....READ ON

Avalanche Advisory for Sunday, April 17, 2016

Date: April 17, 2016
The most present danger today will be the several objective hazards that must be recognized for safe travel: falling ice,waterfall holes, and long sliding falls.

Avalanche Advisory for Saturday, April 16, 2016

Date: April 16, 2016
The climber’s right side of the Bowl, near and under “The Lip”, harbor the most and deepest holes. A skier fell near the top of the Lip yesterday and had a near miss with the Open Book hole. He, like most folks, was surprised to hear that the hole is around 70’ deep. It is unlikely that a fall into this hole, which lies in the fall line of the narrows of the run, is survivable. The waterfall hole flanking the narrows above is just as deep.
Falling ice – Large, falling ice chunks can move with surprising speed on destructive, unpredictable trajectories.The best thing you can do to reduce your exposure to this hazard is by limiting the time spent below these frozen waterfalls. "Icefall Rocks" (Lunch Rocks) and beneath Center Bowl (the Headwall) are in the crosshairs and are a bad place to sit, sled or hang around in.

Avalanche Advisory for Friday, April 15, 2016

Date: April 15, 2016
....Due to the rain from several days ago, and multiple melt-freeze cycles since then, avalanche problems are minimal. As slopes heat up today from their hard frozen state this morning, steep untracked slopes may be vulnerable to a ski/board induced wet loose problem. Think about sluff management and not allowing wet moving snow to suck you in by having a plan before entering untracked slopes.... (Read on for other significant hazards)

Avalanche Advisory for Thursday, April 14, 2016

Date: April 14, 2016
Sunny skies and light winds will make it feel much warmer in the Ravines and will allow slopes to soften up to pretty much ideal spring skiing conditions. Some slopes are starting out harder and icier than others so timing and choosing the right aspect at the correct time is the name of the game. Be prepared for the snow to refreeze later in the day or by aspect when slopes begin to move into the shade. Being stuck on or above an icy slope, or committing to a potentially frozen one, ratchets up the risk and consequences. As always, crampons and ice axe and the judgement to choose safer but satisfying options through the terrain are useful tools to bring with you.

Avalanche Advisory for Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Date: April 13, 2016
.....Yesterday's primary avalanche problem of Wet Slab, due to warm temperatures and +/- 0.5" rain on Wind Slab, dissipated quickly overnight as temperatures fell. The snowpack is freezing from the surface down increasing strength, dramatically reducing avalanche problems, and giving the primary mountain hazard concerns over to falling ice, crevasses, and hard steep surface conditions...

Avalanche Advisory for Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Date: April 12, 2016
The primary avalanche hazard today is Wet Slab. With rainfall currently intensifying, the peak of avalanche danger will be this morning. Once the temperatures drop, the danger of wet slabs will decrease as the snowpack freezes. Wind slabs formed from the 5.8” of snow since Friday that turned to wet slabs are the primary threat today...

Avalanche Advisory for Monday, April 11, 2016

Date: April 11, 2016
Today’s avalanche problem will be Wind Slab transitioning to Wet Slab. Avalanche hazard will increase throughout the day due to forecasted weather...Travel in avalanche terrain today will require cautious route-finding with natural avalanches in several places being possible.

Avalanche Advisory for Sunday, April 10, 2016

Date: April 10, 2016
Today’s avalanche problem is wind slab. Winds ramped up last night, further scouring some areas while loading new snow in others. There is still a fair amount of icy old surface visible through the summit fog this morning but the larger pillows scattered around are large enough in the moderate rated areas to create concerns for human-triggered avalanches. Read on for more.

Avalanche Advisory for Saturday, April 9, 2016

Date: April 9, 2016
The Sluice, Lip, Center Bowl, and Chute have Moderate avalanche danger. Natural avalanches are unlikely and human-triggered avalanches are possible. Heightened avalanche conditions exist in certain terrain features within these forecast areas.

Avalanche Advisory for Friday, April 8, 2016

Date: April 8, 2016
Today’s avalanche problem will be in the form of wind slabs. Snow shower activity this morning, coupled with upslope snow showers this afternoon, may produce 2-4” of snow. This new snow will be falling on a refrozen rain crust with wind speeds in the 30-45mph range. Wind slabs sensitive to human-triggering may form in lee areas of a southwest wind and crossload in other areas. If wind and snow remain on the lighter side, expect only pockets of unstable snow. Snow totals near 4” with wind speeds at the upper end of the forecast velocity could develop larger areas of wind slab that will be harder to avoid.