Entries by Frank Carus

Saddle Peak, MT avalanche fatality

As with any avalanche fatality, there are opportunities to learn from tragic events. Of particular interest to me in this case is the size of the avalanche and the timing of the rescue. Both the avalanche size, type, track and bed surface are similar to avalanches frequently occurring in and near our forecast area. The […]

New snow and weather data

  You may notice a couple of changes to the web advisory today. We frequently refer to the snowplot at Hermit Lake in our advisory but will be including the raw data which is collected every morning by the caretaker at the AMC operated facility there. You need to go to the full forecast to […]

Sliding fall in Hillman’s Highway

Icy conditions will always be a challenge despite the use of self-arrest poles. Once momentum is gained from a skiing fall or unchecked fall while climbing, it is doubtful that even a a well deployed ice axe would work on a knife hardness, icy and steep surface such as the conditions encountered in the report […]

Local Mountain Weather Course

The White Mountain Avalanche Education Foundation and the NHOC are sponsoring a Mountain Weather Workshop in North Conway, NH. Senior Forecaster and Education Specialist Mike Carmon, of the Mount Washington Observatory, will be teaching topics relevant to avalanche forecasting and mountain travel in the White Mountains.

White Heat Tracks Project and Decision Making

Given the tendency of otherwise smart people to make foolish decisions at times, that get themselves hurt or worse, this project seems worth making an effort to support. Link below to the site that explains the project along with helpful Q & A’s. So far, this project has had no input from the Ice Coast. […]

Avalanche Talk, Saturday, January 20

The White Mountain Avalanche Education Foundation, along with the Mount Washington Avalanche Center, is bringing back the Avalanche Education Continuing Ed Series at IME this winter. They will take place the 3rd Saturday of January (20th), February (17th) and March (17th). Come by IME at 5 pm to hear the MWAC Snow Rangers share the […]

The costs of rescue

In 1978, a prolonged search for two missing climbers led to disaster. One of the rescuers involved recently told his story to an audience in Portsmouth on the radio show, “The Moth”. Great advancements in snow and avalanche science as well as avalanche rescue gear have been made since that tragic day, but mountain rescuers […]

Wet avalanche in Tuckerman Ravine

Starting late on Thursday, January 11th, southwest flow brought a prolonged period of rain to the region. This rain saturated the thick snowpack that has developed from the 144” of total summit snowfall to date this winter. By Friday night, over 2” of rain had fallen on the summit with temperatures in the 40’s F […]

Volunteer help needed

As some of you may know already, our avalanche forecasting operation involves much more than snow study field work and sipping coffee while studying weather data on the internet. Our work is complicated by maintaining the equipment and trails necessary to provide for search and rescue response as well. Not only does this equipment, need […]

Risk and reward

  I’d love for this post, just days before the 7th Annual Snow and Avalanche Workshop, to be an avalanche advisory. Heck, I’d be content with a General Bulletin warning of potentially unstable pockets of snow. But the reality is that the weather, and the climate, sets the stage for mountain travel conditions and the […]

We’re looking for a new Snow Ranger….

Do you have skills that you can bring to the USFS team? The Mount Washington Avalanche Center will be advertising and filling a full-time, year round position soon. In addition to avalanche forecasting, outreach and education and SAR responsibilities during the winter and spring months, this position also manages the backcountry and wilderness program on […]

The Risky Business of Avalanche Problems

Social media has been alive and bristling with opinions on last weekend’s avalanche cycle. Rather than join that fray, on social media anyway, I thought I would share a few thoughts here from the perspective of an avalanche forecaster, former guide, and rescuer. Friday night, March 31, we received 12 inches of snow on light […]

Stranded climbers

At around 11:30a.m., a pair of hikers set out from Pinkham Notch to summit via Huntington Ravine. At approximately 4:45p.m., snow ranger staff were contacted by AMC front desk staff that there were 2 hikers stranded near Central Gully in Huntington Ravine. Scouting in the Ravine revealed that the pair of climbers were actually located approximately […]

March 11, Elevated avalanche danger and continued wind loading

5″ of snow in the past 24 hours combined with strong west winds make large, human-triggered avalanches possible in Tuckerman Ravine. As a result, expect Considerable avalanche danger in the Lip, Center Bowl and Chute. Wide spread but smaller wind-slabs in Huntington so expect Moderate danger there, possibly pushing towards Considerable in a few strong […]