Avalanche Advisory for Wednesday, 3-21-2012

This advisory expires at midnight Wednesday, 3-21-2012

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.  Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington. A danger of falling ice exists, and will persist until it all comes down.

As the days keep getting warmer I began falling into a time warp, propelled forward to mid-summer.  I seriously started to forget what month we were in as even shorts and a t-shirt seemed too hot.  Another couple of days in the 80’s F for our local valleys will continue to wreck havoc on our mountain snowpack.  Looking up at the south facing gullies of Huntington and seeing bare rock this morning, with a few specks of white, is a testament to what a summer like sun can do in rapid fashion.  

With this record heat wave for mid March comes our laundry list of springtime hazards and transitions which are changing day by day, and even by the hour in some cases.

  1. FALLING ICE. Once again, this is the number one concern today. Icefall is a very real threat in Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines.  The recent heat has begun sending ice crashing to the floor below.  Falling ice has seriously injured and killed numerous visitors in the past. The best way to manage this hazard is to avoid spending time beneath potential icefall.  Remember that ice doesn’t always fall in a straight line and it can explode into thousands of pieces as it impacts rocks. Lunch Rocks is in the path of huge amounts of falling ice from both the Headwall and the Sluice.  Even though it’s been a popular place to sit for a long time, Lunch Rocks should really be re-named ICEFALL ROCKS!  It is a very bad place to sit. More people have been hurt in this area than any other in the Ravine.  Sitting across the Ravine on the left, or south side, is a much better option.
  2. UNDERMINED SNOW.  As streams melt out the snow from below and heat weakens the top, you stand a good chance of punching through. There are many places where the water level below the snow is up enough that you’d be in trouble if this happens. Stick to the areas where the snow is deepest and avoid thin spots near rocks and bushes.
  3. CREVASSES. So far this year the crevasse hazard hasn’t been too bad, but they have begun to open.  The main waterfall hole just to the Left of the Lip area however, has completely opened up as it does every year.  Avoid traveling too closely to the edge of this hazardous place and other openings that are developing. Hiking up what you plan on descending will help tremendously to recognize all the hazards you may face. 

Sluff runnels from the Lip over to the Chute are getting deeper and are causing significant problems for even the best skiers and riders.  Left Gully and Hillman’s Highway offer the best snow coverage, the longest runs, and the least amount of hazards in terms of icefall, undermining and crevasses.  These two gullies stand out for us as the best recommendations.  Of course it will still be important to look for general mountain risks even in the safest locations.

The lower 25% of the Sherburne Ski Trail is closed.  Cross over at the rope directing you back over to the hiking trail. It’s only a short walk to Pinkham from there so please do not walk down the ski trail.  It is not designed to handle foot traffic.  Therefore in addition to causing erosion, mud will likely overwhelm the tops of your boots.

The Lion Head Summer Trail is open and the winter Lion Head route is now closed. Please avoid using the winter route to avoid damaging the soil on the steep section of trail.  Although the summer trail is snow covered it is much less technical than the winter option.  The Tuckerman Ravine Trail from Pinkham Notch has a lot of exposed water ice. Traction devices or poles may be helpful. If you want to skin up the trail, you will probably want to walk the first mile with your skis on your pack.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

3-21-2012 Print Friendly

Avalanche Advisory for Tuesday, 3-20-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Tuesday, 3-20-2012

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.

Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington. A danger of falling ice exists, and will persist until it all comes down.

Happy first day of spring, everyone! If you’re like me, you didn’t realize the official transition from winter to spring hadn’t yet happened. The summer-like weather will be continuing today. A quick look at the weather history shows that the summit’s average temperature has been 30F or greater for 7 of the last 8 days. We’ve got a few more days of unseasonably warm temperatures before any relief whatsoever. With this heat wave comes our laundry list of springtime hazards and transitions:

  1. Falling Ice. Once again, this is the number one concern I have this morning. Icefall is a very real threat in Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines. From the divots in the snow, it appears as though one sizeable chunk has fallen from the Sluice toward Lunch Rocks. There is plenty more where that came from, as well as in the headwall. Remember, falling ice can kill you. The best way to manage this hazard is to avoid spending time beneath potential icefall. The ice doesn’t always fall in a straight line, and it can explode into thousands of pieces as it impacts rocks. Lunch Rocks is in the path of huge amounts of falling ice. It is not a safe place to sit.
  2. Undermined Snow. This is beginning to become a problem in more areas than just the stream above the Little Headwall. As streams melt out the snow from below and heat weakens the top, you stand a good chance of punching through. There are many places where the water level below the snow is up enough that you’d be in trouble if this happens. Stick to the areas where the snow is deepest and avoid thin spots near rocks and bushes.
  3. Crevasses. So far this year the crevasse hazard hasn’t been too bad, but we are starting to see some holes open up in the headwall and Lip area. Avoid traveling too closely to the edge of these openings.

All things considered, the skiing and riding conditions are doing all right. There are sluff runnels forming that can easily trip up even the best athletes. The N-facing slopes tend to have more snow than other areas. I’d recommend Hillman’s and Left Gully as two of the best locations. Bring your fattest boards to stay atop the deep wet snowpack.  

The lower section of the Sherburne Ski Trail will be closed as of today. There will be a rope to direct you back toward the hiking trail. Do not walk down the ski trail; you will only contribute to erosion of the muddy trail.

We have transitioned to the Lion Head Summer Trail. The winter Lion Head route is now closed. Please avoid using this route to avoid damaging the soil on the steep section of trail. The summer trail does still have a lot of snow on it. Plan for wet snow and postholing over the next several days.

The Tuckerman Ravine Trail from Pinkham Notch has a lot of exposed water ice. Traction devices or poles may be helpful. If you want to skin up the trail, you will probably want to walk the first mile with your skis on your pack.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

2012-03-20 print friendly

Avalanche Advisory for Monday, 3-19-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Monday, 3-19-2012

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.

Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington. A danger of falling ice exists, and will persist until it all comes down.

And it continues…another day with record breaking temperatures for Mt. Washington. The only difference for today will be some clouds and a slight chance of a rain shower. In case you spent the weekend watching basketball games in your basement man cave, the weather was unbelievably hot and sunny for the middle of March. Overall traffic was lighter than expected, but there were several hundred people each day testing the resiliency of last year’s bottle of sunblock and enjoying turns. Sources tell us that about 100 or so people were in Huntington on Saturday, more than I’ve ever seen there in a single day. Over the past week or so, winter has rapidly disappeared and springtime has fully overtaken the mountain. This has brought on the full range of spring conditions and associated hazards. The laundry list of items you should know about includes:

  • Falling Ice. Both Tuckerman and Huntington have a lot of ice hanging on the steep slopes, waiting to crash to the floor. It’s been cooking in the sun for a week or so, getting weaker by the day. This will come down at some point, and you don’t want to be nearby when it goes. Lunch Rocks sits in the fall zone of the most dangerous ice in Tuckerman, so don’t think of Lunch Rocks as a safe place to sit!
  • The Little Headwall is no longer an option for exiting Tuckerman Ravine. The fastest and easiest way down is to pack up your skis and hike down to Hermit Lake.
  • Crevasses and the waterfall hole are beginning to open up under the ice in the Headwall and near the Lip. The growth of these over the past few days has been impressive. Give them wide berth, because they’re going to be larger underneath the snow than the opening you can see at the surface.
  • The Sherburne Ski Trail has been melting quickly. We anticipate closing the lower sections of the trail beginning early this week. When you get to the rope, head over to the hiking trail for the rest of the way down.
  • The Lion Head winter route is now closed. Please avoid using this route to avoid damaging the soil on the steep section of trail. The summer trail is open but does have a lot of snow on it. Plan for wet snow and postholing over the next several days.

We’d like to thank everyone who helped out with rescue efforts on Saturday. It’s been a long time since we’ve had a helicopter land on the floor of the ravine, and we could not have done this without everyone’s cooperation. So even if all you did was stay out of the way, we thank you.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

2012-03-19 print friendly

Skier Tuckerman Ravine

A skier was injured while booting up the Chute when he attempted to stop another falling skier.  The patient suffered a 2″ laceration to the left ear.  MWVSP members treated and released the patient.  The falling skier was uninjured.

Lion Head Trail

A hiker injured her knee while descending from the summit.  USFS Snow Rangers encountered the woman, who was a member of a guided party, at the Tuckerman/Lion Head Summer Route trail junction and transported the patient to Pinkham Notch via snowmobile drawn litter.

Avalanche Advisory for Sunday, 3-18-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Sunday, 3-18-2012

Tuckerman Ravine has Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.

Huntington Ravine is under a General Advisory. You will need to do your own snow stability assessments when using avalanche terrain in Huntington. A danger of falling ice exists, and will persist until it all comes down.

I wish I could simply say that today will be more of the same weather we had yesterday, but that simply wouldn’t be true. Years from now, we’ll be sitting around the woodstove telling stories of how wacky the weather was back in March 2012. Pay attention this month, so you’ll be able to get the story straight when those times arrive. Mt. Washington has already crested its record high temperature for the day. By dusk, that record will have been crushed with temperatures maybe reaching 50F (10C) on the summit. The long range forecast has valley temperatures in the 70s F for several more days this coming week. Soooo…how is that impacting the spring ski scene here?

The snowpack is going to be deteriorating rapidly. So far, we’ve already swapped to the Lion Head summer trail, begun issuing General Advisories for Huntington, and parked our snow cat for the season. Currently there is good coverage in a lot of areas, especially Hillman’s, Left Gully, and the Chute. The quality of the snow will be going downhill though. The lack of freezing temperatures at night and the intense heat create wet slushy snow. This carves deep runnels as the sluff skiers kick off flows downhill. These get progressively deeper, and negotiating these troughs is challenging. Overall, we are well ahead of where we normally are at this time of year. This means the annual springtime hazards have emerged and you need to be aware of them.

  1. Falling Ice. Through the years, there have been many significant injuries and even fatalities from falling ice. The best way to protect yourself is to avoid spending time in the potential path of icefall, which can happen almost anywhere right now. In Tuckerman, the most dangerous ice can be found in the Center Bowl as well as directly above Lunch Rocks in the Sluice. If ice falls from the Sluice, it can send shrapnel into every nook and cranny of Lunch Rocks. For this reason, Lunch Rocks is not a safe place to sit! You’re better off parking yourself down low in the floor or on the climber’s left side of the Bowl.
  2. Undermined Snow. Currently, this hazard looms largest for those who want to exit the bowl via the Little Headwall. The Little Headwall itself has already collapsed and is an open waterfall. The streambed above is a series of open water holes and weak snow bridges. I strongly recommend taking off your skis and hiking the trail back to Hermit Lake.
  3. Crevasses. This hazard forms as the wintertime snowpack creeps slowly downhill, pulling away from cliffs, rocks, and in places, from itself. These are just beginning to open up, but over the next few days I think we’ll start to see them become more and more problematic. We recommend hiking up the route you plan to descend so you can assess the hazards in advance.

The Sherburne Ski Trail has taken some abuse this past week. Bare spots, rocks, and water ice have all made their appearance, and with the current weather they’re only going to get worse.

We have transitioned to the Lion Head Summer Trail. The winter Lion Head route is now closed. Please avoid using this route to avoid damaging the soil on the steep section of trail. The Summer Trail does have a lot of snow on it. Plan for wet snow and postholing over the next several days.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

2012-03-18 Print Friendly

Skier Tuckerman Ravine

A skier fell near the top of the Chute, slid to about the Narrows and then “log-rolled” before finally stopping about 200′ above and right Gumdrop Rocks. Witnesses reported that the skier, who was skiing for his first time in Tuckerman Ravine, took about 2 turns and pre-released from the binding of one ski.  Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol members and USFS Snow Rangers responded, treated and packaged the patient who was unconscious and seizing on arrival.  It is unclear whether or not he impacted any rocks during the fall.

Due to the presentation of symptoms and the calm winds, a helicopter evacuation was ordered.  Lifeflight of Maine, flying out of Bangor, transported the patient to Maine Med in Portland. The ability to fly into Tuckerman Ravine is very unusual due to the preponderance of days with turbulence,  high winds, limited visibility, limited landing options or all four factors at once.  Fortunately, a relatively limited number of skiers were in the bowl, which reduced the risk and consequence of mishap with the helicopter.

Avalanche Advisory for Saturday, 3-17-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Saturday, 3-17-2012

All forecast areas of Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines have Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.

In the ten years or so I’ve been working in the White Mountains, one thing I’ve learned is that every winter is unique in some way. This season is no exception. Not only was every month this winter marked by low snowfall amounts, but the springtime meltout has arrived with force. The past week we’ve already lost dramatic amounts of snow, and we’re just about to begin an intense March heat wave. While today won’t break records, expect to see new high temperature marks set tomorrow and later in the week. Snow stability remains good in the ravines today, though you will probably see some sluffing of wet, mushy snow. Currently the “Big Three” springtime hazards are what you need to be aware of while traveling in either Tuckerman or Huntington this weekend.

  1. Falling Ice. Whether it’s Tuckerman or Huntington doesn’t matter. There is a full winter’s worth of ice melting out of the steep cliffs and gullies, waiting to crash to the floor of the ravines. Through the years, there have been many significant injuries and even fatalities from falling ice. The best way to protect yourself is to avoid spending time in the potential path of icefall, which can happen almost anywhere at this time of the year. In Tuckerman, the most dangerous ice can be found in the Center Bowl as well as directly above Lunch Rocks in the Sluice. If ice falls from the Sluice, you will have nowhere to hide as shrapnel flies all around you. For this reason, Lunch Rocks is not a safe place to sit! You’re better off parking yourself down low in the floor or on the climber’s left side of the Bowl.
  2. Undermined Snow. Currently, this hazard looms largest for those who want to exit the bowl via the Little Headwall. The Little Headwall itself has already collapsed and is an open waterfall. The streambed above is a series of open water holes and weak snow bridges. I strongly recommend taking off your skis and hiking the trail back to Hermit Lake.
  3. Crevasses. This hazard forms as the wintertime snowpack creeps slowly downhill, pulling away from cliffs, rocks, and in places, from itself. These are just beginning to open up, but over the next few days I think we’ll start to see them become more and more problematic. We recommend hiking up the route you plan to descend so you can assess the hazards in advance.

General coverage in Tuckerman is still pretty good, all things considered. Left Gully, the Chute, and left side of the Center Bowl all have decent top-to-bottom coverage. A couple things are not worth your time, such as Lobster Claw, the top of Right Gully, and the Little Headwall. Personally, I’d be looking for two things in my choice of ski terrain today, both are aimed at avoiding bottomless mush. First I’d look to areas where others have compacted the snow through the season. Next I’d head toward runs that are out of the direct sun. Off-the-beaten-track runs and those in the direct sun may have a lot of snow, but you’ll be riding a Slurpee by the end of the day.  Climbing these runs may be a frustrating experience as you punch through, even in places with an existing bootpack.

The Sherburne Ski Trail has taken some abuse this past week. Bare spots, rocks, and water ice have all made their appearance, and with the upcoming weather they’re only going to get worse.

We have transitioned to the Lion Head Summer Trail. The winter Lion Head route is now closed. Please avoid using this route to avoid damaging the soil on the steep section of trail. The Summer Trail does have a lot of snow on it. Plan for wet snow and postholing over the next several days.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

2012-03-17 Print Friendly

Avalanche Advisory for Friday, 3-16-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Friday, 3-16-2012

 All forecast areas of Tuckerman and Huntington Ravines have Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely.

If you’re traveling into the ravines today or during the upcoming heat wave, throw out all your preconceived notions of what March is supposed to look like up here. From the appearances of it, the annual melt-out is a month ahead of schedule, if not more. Expect the full onslaught of springtime hazards:

  1. Falling Ice. Whether it’s Tuckerman or Huntington doesn’t matter. There is a full winter’s worth of ice melting out of the steep cliffs and gullies, waiting to crash to the floor of the ravines. Through the years, there have been many significant injuries and even fatalities from falling ice. The best way to protect yourself is to not spend time in the potential path of icefall, which can happen almost anywhere at this time of the year. In Tuckerman, the most dangerous ice can be found in the Center Bowl as well as directly above Lunch Rocks in the Sluice.
  2. Undermined Snow. Currently, this hazard looms largest for those who want to exit the bowl via the Little Headwall. The Little Headwall itself has already collapsed and is an open waterfall. The streambed above is a series of open water holes and weak snow bridges. If you punch through into the icy water, the term “chest deep” might take on a new meaning for you. I strongly suggest you plan to walk out from the bowl, rather than try to find a way through this area.
  3. Crevasses. This hazard forms as the wintertime snowpack creeps slowly downhill, pulling away from cliffs, rocks, and in places, from itself. These are just beginning to open up, but over the next few days I think we’ll start to see them become more and more problematic. We recommend hiking up the route you plan to descend so you can assess the hazard in advance.

If you have the opportunity to stall for a day, you might want to think about not coming today and coming during the weekend instead. Today’s weather forecast isn’t a pretty one. A warm front will turn rain showers into steadier rain this afternoon. About a tenth to a quarter inch of rain is expected in total. Personally, I’d rather be out in sub-zero temperatures than 40F rain. I find nothing more uncomfortable than being wet in these conditions. With that in mind, be sure to bring a couple extra dry layers and some sort of protective shell for today’s weather. Skip the typical post-ski beverage and bring a thermos of something hot instead. If you’re coming this weekend, bring the sunblock, beach chairs, and umbrellas, because it’s going to be that kind of weather for the foreseeable future. I’m not sure how low temperatures will get down to in the overnights, but let’s hope it dips below freezing each night just to help preserve what precious little snowpack there is. If you’re traveling off the beaten path, expect deep wet snow, difficult postholing, and slow progress.

The Sherburne Ski Trail has taken some abuse this past week. Bare spots, rocks, and water ice have all made their appearance, and with the upcoming weather they’re only going to get worse. We’ll post a Weekend Update later this afternoon with some more detailed prognostications for the next couple days.

Please remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.

Jeff Lane, Snow Ranger
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856

2012-03-16 Print Friendly

Avalanche Advisory for Thursday, 3-15-2012

This advisory expires at midnight, Thursday 3-15-2012

All forecast areas of Tuckerman Ravine and Huntington Ravine have Low avalanche danger. Natural and human triggered avalanches are unlikely except in isolated terrain features.

I pushed all the melancholy spirits out of me yesterday and I have officially said goodbye to winter.  Until the next late winter storm I am fully embracing the idea that spring is here!  We have picked up a dusting of snow overnight and another shot is on the way overnight and into Friday.  This should come in the form of rain due to a warm front passing through the area.  After that, holy cow, say hello to sun, heat, and record breaking high temperatures!  Beginning Saturday sun will dominate the skies bringing the valley mercury up to the 65-70F degree range.  So, outside of our stable snowpack the main thing to talk about is the onset of Spring hazards. 

The slow emergence of crevasses is slowly going to become an issue over the next week.  They are currently small and just beginning to peak out, but this will change under the fireball in the sky over the next 6 days.  Prepare to watch them grow.  Undermining of snow by brooks, streams, and the heat of rocks and bushes is an increasing concern.  It can make snow bridges collapse under your weight particularly while attempting to ski over known streams like when exiting the Tuckerman floor. The most immediate hazard to you is falling ice this week.  Clear skies and direct solar gain over the weekend will warm rock, melt ice bonds, and begin sending a winter’s worth of ice formations crashing down.  Falling ice has caused significant injuries and fatalities over the years and needs to be taken seriously.  The dominate location for this problem is south facing pitches followed by east slopes like the Tuckerman Headwall.  The entire spring hazard discussion will be ramped up over the next few days as well as tomorrow’s “Weekend Update”, issued in the late afternoon.  The brook leaving the floor and the Little Headwall is pretty close to being done, and likely will be sometime this weekend due to some of the warmest temperatures this season on the way.  It wouldn’t surprise me if everybody will need to walk out of the Ravine within the next several days.  The vast majority of skiers and riders are already walking out and we’ll keep you updated daily on this situation.

   In Huntington Ravine climbers will face conditions more similar to mid or late April.   Anticipate questionable ice protection in the sun, so rock gear will obviously be a better option when the terrain allows.  Undoubtedly there will be cold nights and days ahead so timing is everything.   Skiing conditions on the Sherburne Ski Trail should be a little firm to begin the day but should change to softer conditions as the fog burns off and the sun’s heat penetrates frozen surfaces.  You will encounter a number of bare patches down low.  I would expect the trail to change considerably by the end of the weekend.

Please Remember:

  • Safe travel in avalanche terrain requires training and experience. This advisory is just one tool to help you make your own decisions in avalanche terrain. You control your own risk by choosing where, when, and how you travel.
  • Anticipate a changing avalanche danger when actual weather differs from the higher summits forecast.
  • For more information contact the Forest Service Snow Rangers, the AMC at the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, or the caretakers at Hermit Lake Shelters or the Harvard Cabin.  
  • Posted 8:40a.m. A new advisory will be issued tomorrow.
 

Christopher Joosen, Snow Ranger     
USDA Forest Service
White Mountain National Forest
(603) 466-2713 TTY (603) 466-2856
www.mountwashingtonavalanchecenter.org

2012-03-15 Print Version