Injured Skier Tuckerman Ravine

A 44 year old male was skiing in the Lower Snowfields of Tuckerman Ravine when he hit a section of “boilerplate” snow. He slid head-first into the trees suffering a shoulder dislocation and leg injury before coming to rest. He was treated by the USFS Snow Rangers and members of the MWVSP, transported to Pinkham Notch via USFS snow tractor, and transferred to an ambulance.

Group of three climbers fell while simul-climbing upper pitches of Pinnacle Gully

A group of three climbers fell while simul-climbing upper pitches of Pinnacle Gully. It was a very busy Saturday in Huntington Ravine. Temperatures Friday were warm and sunny, and then overnight they stayed above the freezing mark. Saturday was also warm and sunny, so there was a significant amount of water running over the snow and ice in the gully. One party of two had climbed the first pitch and was preparing to rappel off due to the excessive water. Another party, including a local guide (KM) and his two clients had also climbed the first pitch but rather than contend with the water, the guide climbed out of the gully on the rock to the right. As this was going on the party of three was simul-climbing from the top of the first pitch (they had used traditional belays for the first pitch). DH was leading, TV was in the middle of the 60 meter rope, and GT was tied into the bottom end.

Between the top of the first pitch and the top of the climb, DH had 7 pieces of protection: one fixed piton, four ice screws, a V-thread left by another party, and an ice axe deeply sunk and tied off. Just as DH was about to exit the gully, he felt the slack in the rope tighten up. After waiting a moment and not getting more slack to move upward, he stepped down a bit into a good stance to give slack to the climbers below him. At this time, TV had ascended to the second ice screw; GT had passed and unclipped the piton and V-thread but had not yet arrived at the first screw. As she was at the second screw and after unclipping it, TV began to have problems with her crampon falling off. She commented afterward that she didn’t really know what to do and probably should have clipped directly into the screw or even reclipped the rope. After a couple minutes without much progress GT began to climb up to assist her. This created a lot of slack between the bottom two climbers. TV eventually fell, pulling DH out of his stance near the top of the gully. He said that it happened very quickly so he didn’t really know what was happening. The ice tool and two screws above TV were ripped out of the ice, and the two climbers began falling simultaneously down the gully. The fall was stopped by a single 10cm ice screw that was between GT and TV. Had this screwed pulled out as well, it is likely that all three climbers would have fallen over the first pitch, and possibly brought down other climbers with them.

According to the two clients of KM, DH fell down the left side of the gully and near the bottom hit the rocks, bouncing him across to the other side and missing them by only a few feet. The two came to rest near the top of the first pitch, having fallen approximately 300’ (DH) and 100’ (TV). Neither climber was seriously injured. KM quickly responded, assisting the entire group down off of the climb and stayed with them until out of the steep terrain in Huntington Ravine. Snow Rangers learned of the incident fro the HMC caretaker who had heard about it from someone else. The climbers were encountered descending the trail to Pinkham Notch. They were bruised and slightly bloody otherwise uninjured and they walked themselves to the bottom.

Injured Climber

A 20 year old male sustained a laceration to his eyebrow area as a result of being accidentally kicked while climbing below another person. He was assessed by a member of the MWVSP and provided with bandaging for the wound. Lesson learned—don’t follow too closely in the boot pack. Pay attention to what’s above you, whether it’s the person just above, a snowboard rocketing down slope, or any of the other things that come tumbling down the mountain (like large blocks of ice.)

Snowboarder sustained a laceration to his shin during a fall in the Lip

A 22 year old male snowboarder sustained a laceration to his shin during a fall in the Lip. He apparently fell hard enough to pull his feet out of his boots, which remained firmly attached in his bindings. We believe it was the snowboard that caused the 2” laceration. He was provided bandages by a local guide who was skiing with his children that day and a physician walked with him to the top of the Little Headwall where he was met by a USFS Snow Ranger. He walked down from Hermit Lake under his own power.

Fall Lion Head Winter Route

A hiker was descending the steep section Lion Head Winter Route when snow had balled up in his crampon causing him to fall. He fell approximately 50 feet, injuring his lower leg during the fall. While bystanders began to haul him down the trail the Snow Ranger that was returning to Hermit Lake from the first incident rerouted to respond to the second incident. The patient’s injuries were stabilized and he was transported to Pinkham Notch by snowmobile as well.

The Lion Head Winter Route is a steep trail where conditions change quickly from day to day or even during the course of a single day. We recommend mountaineering equipment (i.e. an ice axe and crampons) be used for safer travel on this route along with the ability to properly use the equipment. In this instance, the patient had crampons and ski poles rather than an ice axe. For the purposes of arresting a fall in steep terrain, an ice axe is a far more effective tool than ski poles. Prior to these incidents, the Snow Rangers had not responded to any other injured or lost people this winter/spring season.

Injured his knee skiing down Hillman’s Highway

A skier who injured his knee while skiing down Hillman’s Highway. His partner was able to assist him out of steep terrain and down to the first aid cache at the bottom of Hillman’s. His injury was assessed by an M.D. with the Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol and stabilized for transportation by USFS snowmobile to Pinkham Notch.

The Lion Head Winter Route is a steep trail where conditions change quickly from day to day or even during the course of a single day. We recommend mountaineering equipment (i.e. an ice axe and crampons) be used for safer travel on this route along with the ability to properly use the equipment. In this instance, the patient had crampons and ski poles rather than an ice axe. For the purposes of arresting a fall in steep terrain, an ice axe is a far more effective tool than ski poles. Prior to these incidents, the Snow Rangers had not responded to any other injured or lost people this winter/spring season.